New Seminar on 4th March: Rasmus Kjærboe, A Museum of Modern Art for the Middle Class

Please join us for our next research seminar:
Rasmus Kjærboe, Aarhus University, Denmark
Wednesday 4th March
Room 1.06, 18 Windsor Terrace
1 – 2pm

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A museum of modern art for the middle class: Two seminal cases from Denmark
Why build your own museum? My talk presents two seminal Danish museums that combine nature, architecture, art and domesticity in a total package. Both Ordrupgaard (1918) and the more well-known Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (1958) arose from private initiative, and their particular idiom of informal leisure in a museum setting has since become strongly influential. As deliberate societal interventions, the two were in opposition to the oppressive public museums of their time. Instead, they aimed at shaping and educating an emerging middle class to the art of modernity through popular appeal. This meant a new focus on bodily participation and a new convergence between exhibitions, surroundings and the phenomenology of pleasurable experience.

Rasmus Kjærboe is currently a PhD Fellow at Aarhus University, Denmark. His project on the collection museum of modern art takes Ordrupgaard, today a state-sponsored museum of French 19th century art and post-impressionism, as its central case. Coming from art history, Rasmus has published on topics of museum studies, sculpture and public memorials and held a position as lecturer in theories of art and museology at Copenhagen University for several years. Rasmus is the Vice-President of the Danish Association of Art Historians and editor of Kunsthistorisk Bogliste, the Danish art historical book review.

New Seminar: Walkthrough Research, Wednesday 25 February

We have an exciting seminar coming up on 25th February from 1 – 2pm.

Jakob Bak is coming to ICCHS from Denmark to speak to us about ‘walkthrough research’ techniques. More information below.

Jakob has offered to bring some of the specially designed glasses along, and will run a hands-on session after the seminar. Please let me know if you are interested in taking part in this extra session by sending an email to j.l.locke@newcastle.ac.uk

Hope to see you there.

Jakob Bak, Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CIID)

Jakob-Bak-profile-picture

Wednesday 25th February 1 – 2pm

Walkthrough Research

Throughout the European research project “MeLa* – Museums in an Age of Migration” Chris Whitehead (ICCHS) and Jakob Bak from Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CIID) have been developing a new method for gathering experiential accounts from museum visitors that combine video-based observational techniques with prompted reflection and guided interviewing. Applying the method in both fine arts and social history settings, CIID and ICCHS have through the project examined the possibilities and limitations of such methodology. At this lecture, Jakob will give an introduction to how this can be used in everyday cultural research practice.

Jakob Bak is Research Manager at CIID, coordinating the team’s efforts across European research projects and other activities. With a M.Sc.Eng in Design & Innovation from the Danish Technical University (DTU) as well as involvement in Copenhagen based Art and Technology collective Science Friction, Jakob’s interests spans science studies, haptics, design theory, critical making, sound synthesis and artistic practice. When out of the office Jakob conducts workshops on synthesis, design or prototyping, makes electronic music or generally tries to get a better understanding of interactions between people and systems.

‘Young, Religious and Judged’: Challenging prejudice through Co-Curating Muslim heritage in North East of England

At a time when tensions in Europe around the role of Islam in society are high, many British Muslims are working hard to counter the negative stereotypes perpetuated by the media through collaborations with museums, libraries, archives and galleries, as well as community-led heritage initiatives. Traditional approaches to Muslim communities within the heritage sector have tended to adopt an ‘outreach’ model of community participation, whereby community groups are ‘invited in’ to the museum or archive to contribute to an exhibition or project determined by the organisation. Such approaches have been criticised for failing to address questions of who is doing the including and under what terms? What happens then, if heritage organisations and universities act as facilitators for community-led research, rather than as gatekeepers?

To find out more about how universities and heritage organisations can support the needs of Muslim communities ICCHS Research Associate Katherine Lloyd and Doctorial Researcher Ilmam Tharazi both attended the Everyday Muslim Symposium on Saturday 31st January at the Bishopgate Institute in London. The symposium brought together people from a range of sectors and backgrounds who share an interest in documenting and sharing Muslim heritage. The aim of the event was to facilitate dialogue and collaboration between individuals, groups and institutions working in the field of Muslim heritage.

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Inspiring the audience (including some proud parents) at the Everyday Muslim Symposium

Katherine co-presented a paper with the West End Young Digital Artists, a group of 12-17 year olds from Newcastle who want to challenge prejudice and encourage respect between people from different cultures and religions in the West End of Newcastle as part of their documentary project ‘Young, Religious and Judged’. Katherine has been supporting the group to undertake historical research at Discovery Museum and the West Newcastle Picture History Collection as part of her work on Co-Curate North East, a knowledge exchange project led by Newcastle University that supports communities to document and share their heritage online. The young people showcased their documentary and received a very positive response, with conference participants asking for advice about how they could support young people to undertake similar projects. They also connected with academic researchers who were able to provide them with more information about the history of Muslims in the UK, such as the Yemini community in South Shields. The group are now working on an exhibition of their work that will go in display in Destination Tyneside at Discovery Museum in March. We can’t wait to find out more about their research!

Researching the history of the Yemini community at Destination Tyneside, Discovery Museum

Researching the history of the Yemini community at Destination Tyneside, Discovery Museum

For more information:

WEYDA: Crowdfunding video: https://co-curate.ncl.ac.uk/resources/view/34950

Co-Curate North East: co-curate.ncl.ac.uk 

Everyday Muslim: everydaymuslim.org